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Sherlock Holmes

Hiring decisions by the Bonesmen at the Harriman firm were presented as jolly and distinctly informal, with club and family being prime qualifications. Under Mallon, the company underwent an astonishing transformation. As World War II approached, Dresser began expanding, gobbling up one militarily strategic manufacturer after another.

While Dresser was still engaged in the mundane manufacture of drill bits, drilling mud, and other products useful to the oil industry, it was also moving closer to the heart of the rapidly growing military-industrial sector as a defense contractor and subcontractor. It also assembled a board that would epitomize the cozy relationships between titans of industry, finance, media, government, military, and intelligence — and the revolving door between those sectors. Poppy Gets his Hands Oily. Mallon dispatched the inexperienced Yale grad and Navy vet, with his wife Barbara and firstborn George W.

Oil was certainly a strategic business. A resource required in abundance to fuel the modern navy, army, and air force, oil had driven the engine of World War II. With the end of hostilities, America still had plenty of petroleum, but the demands of the war had exhausted many oil fields. If the young George H.

Introduction

Bush understood anything about the larger game and his expected role in it, he and his wife Barbara certainly did not let on to the neighbors in those early days in dusty West Texas. Dresser was well-known in the right circles as providing handy cover to CIA operatives. Poppy has never written or spoken publicly in any depth about the California period of his career. In later years, when criticized for his anti-union stands, he would pull out a union card which he claimed came from his membership in the United Steelworkers Union.

Why Bush joined the Steelworkers and attended their meetings is something of a mystery, since that union was not operating inside Pacific Pump Works. To be sure, the company was not just pumping water out of the ground anymore. The firm supplied hydraulic-actuating assemblies for airplane landing gear, wing flaps, and bomb doors, and even provided crucial parts for the top-secret process that produced the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Poppy was often absent, according to Barbara, even from their brief-tenure outposts.

Was he truly a Willy Loman, peddling drill bits, dragging a pregnant wife and a one-year-old child with him?

Or was he doing something else? Bush would so effectively obscure his life that even some of his best friends seemed to know little about what he was actually doing — though they may have intuited it. In , during the time Poppy Bush squired a Yugoslav Communist around the oil fields for Dresser Industries, the cold war got hot in an unexpected quarter when North Korean Communist forces launched an invasion of the south.

Heads rolled, and in the ensuing shake-up, Allen Dulles became deputy director in charge of clandestine operations, which included both spying and proactive covert operations. For the Bushes, who had a decades-long personal and business relationship to the Dulles family, this was certainly an interesting development.


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The Dulles and Bush clans had long mixed over business, politics, and friendship, and the corollary to all three — intelligence. Later, the families interacted regularly as the Bush clan plied their trade in investment banking and the Dulleses in the law.

In , Dresser was completing a corporate relocation to Dallas which, besides being an oil capital, was rapidly becoming a center of the defense industry and its military-industrial-energy elite. Though a virtual unknown on his arrival, Neil Mallon quickly set about bringing the conservative titans of Dallas society together in a new local chapter of the non-profit Council on World Affairs, in whose Cleveland branch he had been active. Braniff, a pioneer of the airline industry and member of the Knights of Malta, an exclusive, conservative, Vatican-connected order with longtime intelligence ties; Fred Wooten, an official of the First National Bank of Dallas, which would employ Poppy Bush in the years between his tenure as CIA director and vice president; and Colonel Robert G.

Storey, later named as liaison between Texas law enforcement and the Warren Commission investigating the assassination of President Kennedy. Soon the group moved even closer to the center of power. General Dwight Eisenhower. With Ike the Republican nominee, they all scrambled for seats on his train. The Dulleses were key advisers. Prescott Bush was backing Ike and mounting what would be a successful race for a Senate seat from Connecticut. Bush was not left out. He became the Midland County chairman of the Eisenhower-Nixon campaigns in both and Anderson, a sometime member of the Dresser Industries board.

Eisenhower, with no track record in civilian government and little enthusiasm for the daily grind, was only too happy to leave many of the operational decisions to these others. Some of those businessmen taking it upon themselves to help chart the course were from the Dallas group. Shortly after the group returned, Dulles came to visit with the Dallas council chapter. Eventually, by the seventies and eighties, when Poppy Bush ran the CIA and coordinated covert operations as vice president, hundreds, perhaps thousands, of such entities had been created.

Uncle Herbie also was instrumental in bringing in others, including Eugene Meyer, a Yale graduate and owner of the influential Washington Post. Great stuff! I knew quite little about Ginger Baker so the doc was both informing and entertaining. A very interesting character and life indeed. An impressive array of musicians are interviewed about him and all profess genuine admiration for his drumming abilities. It doesn't go over the top with long solos which was a good call by the director. People can just listen to his records for that. It whets the appetite nicely to go and listen to his work.

Ginger's family come across very well, especially his son, whose love for his father was severely tested on occasion. Like the man himself they are refreshingly unpretentious and down to earth. It's quite an honest film which makes it all the better and suits the subject matter to a t. Baker is quite enigmatic which makes for all the more interest trying to figure him out. It took a brave man to make this documentary and Jay Bulger was the right man to do it.

I would not have been thick-skinned enough to take Mr. A great watch. Thank you sir! Well executed film. While the physical history of Mr Baker is presented, in the end it is his artistic history we learn. The film highlights Baker's many desertions in life. And indeed, eyewitness accounts describe the pain this man has engendered to family, and fellow musicians. Some of the major musicians of our time have one or two line observations, edited around a long, many day, interview with Ginger Baker at his ranch in South Africa. And of course the music. Seven years his junior, I witnessed much of his rock music as it happened.

However, had I read that this review must have a minimum of ten lines, l would not have started it. One of the "insights" is Baker's life-long, always changing, relationship to rhythm and drums. Insightful too, is the volatile relationships in many of his bands. This documentary, written and directed by Jay Bulger, based on the life and career of Ginger Baker, I thought was rather fascinating and filled with surprises. Baker, whom many consider to be the greatest rock drummer of all time, was living, at the time of the filming in a private gated compound in Tulbagh, South Africa.

As one enters the compound a sign clearly states Beware Mr. Baker, perhaps for good reason as Baker is still quite irascible and cantankerous. He's also somewhat debilitated by osteoarthritis, but not slowed enough to stop him from physically attacking the director Bulger at one point with his cane. Apparently, Baker was a prodigy on the drums, able to just sit down one day and start playing.

His first taste of fame came when he became the drummer for the Graham Bond Organisation, in the 's. However, what brought on instant world wide acclaim was being the founding member of the rock group Cream, bringing on Jack Bruce and Eric Clapton, to produce some of the most influential sounds in music history. However, the group only stayed together for about two years, despite their fame. Baker was already showing signs of a violent temper and he apparently was heavily into the drug culture. At one point, he viciously attacked Jack Bruce after an argument.

This would be the beginning of a long series of ups and downs for Baker, which were brought to the screen in the film. I'll just note that these included continued drug use, four marriages, earning then blowing through millions of dollars, many career changes and making a lot of enemies and some friends along the way. Some of the documentary is Bulger interviewing Baker, in South Africa, while the rest is clips of his amazing talent on the drums, interviews with family and many people he worked with in his career , as well as even some animated snippets illustrating parts of his life.

Although I admittedly knew virtually nothing about Ginger Baker before seeing the film, and despite the fact that Baker is obviously not a likable fellow, I was quite fascinated by it and was absorbed by one surprise after another being revealed. Ginger Baker is not only one of the greatest drummers ever but also a character who waits for a movie to be made about him. One day maybe a fiction movie will be made, until them we have 'Beware of Mr. Baker' - the documentary made by Jay Bulger. Rock documentaries are now quite 'en vogue' and there is a good reason for this.

The big rock stars of the 60s and 70s, well, the ones who survived are now at the age of writing or telling on screen their memories. The younger generations may have heard little about 'Cream' or 'Blind Faith' but they do have an opportunity not only to watch part of their concerts luckily filmed concerts technology developed just in time to catch much of their sounds, moves and the atmosphere of their live shows but also to hear fist hand their version of the history of rock.


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  • And fans like me are definitely delighted. Baker' is centered around the interview reluctantly given by Baker at his ranch in South-Africa. He is one of those anti-social partners of discussion that you sometimes pity the interviewers about. He certainly loves to complain about his family, other musicians, life and fate in general - one of these guys who seem to love themselves much less than the world lives and admires them.

    We learn much more about his life from interviews with members of his family his first wife seems still to have a crush on him, his son's best memory is having made music with his father and with other musicians. It's the story of a life damaged by drugs abuse and a pattern of behavior that preempted Baker from establishing good working relations with any of his colleague musicians and eventually led to the early breaking of all bands he played in.

    Yet, it is also doubtful if in the absence of this temper and even of the use of drugs his music would have been the same. And music is what is left at the end from such personalities. Great music in the case of Mr. This is a quote from "Beware of Mr.

    Baker" which very well describes the character this documentary is about. It's the first directorial effort from Jay Bulger and as he gets beaten with a cane by his protagonist, it certainly wasn't an easy effort. Cream and Ginger Baker's great years were way before my time, so I went into this one knowing almost nothing about it. But it's always nice to know about new things and I wasn't disappointed with the outcome. Ginger Baker, the infamous drummer, is as interesting as it gets and certainly deserves his own documentary tribute, even if he's way into his 70s now that this was made.

    The crass, almost horror-like animation used in the film nicely emphasized how it's a fine line between genius and insanity, a description that is probably hardly more accurate for anybody than Mr. Also I wouldn't mind watching a film about his life that is completely animated in the style it was used here. And I didn't need to know much about playing the drums to see this man's incredible talent. However, there's always another approach to this character and the perfect counterpart to his insanity is also something that I liked the way it was depicted here: his love to animals, especially horses.

    It was very sweet to see his weaker, more vulnerable site and how he truly adored these animals that probably became the center of his life at some point and a bit of a haven for him to compensate for his wild side. Also, I thought the ending was very well done, to see Ginger Baker back from his isolation in South Africa to the stage doing what he always did best, playing the drums and having a great time doing so, especially after saying earlier in the film that his motivation and health when it comes to music are almost completely gone.

    I had admittedly one big "what-the-hell"-moment when I saw him writing an ad for a newspaper to look for a band. Really can't believe a man with his talent, considered by many as one of the greatest to have ever played the drums, could sink so low that he'd have to take drastic measures like these to do what he loved. It was shocking to see how he basically made not much money at all despite being possibly the great creative force behind Cream as he wasn't the one who wrote the songs. It made me happy to see he reached great commercial and critical success afterward again though.

    Another thing I quite enjoyed was to see him in Africa during his younger years. He always seemed to have had a special connection to the Black continent going until today with South Africa and his marriage to a local being possibly the last chapter of this life and it was great to witness how local tribes and their approach to music clearly inspired him in his work.

    Baker" is a film I'd recommend. It's probably even a must-see for music lovers of the s and s as you see many artists Clapton, Santana And for people like me, it's perfect to broaden their horizons and find out about artists from back in the day that we may not have been familiar with before. Admittedly, Baker is such a colorful character, who accosts and swears like a pirate, but is also sensitive, and I'm a bit surprised I never came across him earlier.

    I wouldn't say this film was an eye-opener and that I keep listening to his music all the time now, but it was still nice to get to know him and I applaud Bulger for making this documentary. Lejink 29 April Not an obvious choice for a documentary, grumpy old man, no make that just grumpy man, celebrated Cream drummer Ginger Baker spectacularly opens his own film by beating up his director, followed by a glowing tribute from of all people John Lydon and then proceeds to diss the majority of the several people who crossed his path in later life.

    His story gets told mainly from his own viewpoint but naturally we get tributes from the drummers union including the likes of Charlie Watts, Neil Peart and Stewart Copeland as well as most of his past collaborators including of course his Cream band-mates Jack Bruce and Eric Clapton together with archive footage and some animation to highlight his world travels. I've not heard much of Cream outside of their most popular tracks but I do know he takes the dubious responsibility for introducing the extended drum solo to rock recordings and concerts.

    It certainly seemed to me that his playing, good as it is, pales next to some of his jazz heroes with whom we see him engaging in "drum wars" in the early 70's. Of more interest then is the picture painted of this very eccentric man, with apparently a greater love for animals, particularly horses and dogs than his own family and ex-wives, indeed I had no idea he was such a keen polo player. And yet, while I wouldn't care to meet him, it was fascinating to watch this story of his varied life.

    Buying Options

    Post-Cream there's little here to engage with musically unless you like endless drum solos but this unlikely documentary will capture and hold your attention and who amongst us wouldn't share to some degree his rebellious outlook against conformity for the last 50 years. This doc is about and features the somewhat eccentric but amazing drummer Ginger Baker, of Cream and Blind Faith fame.

    The film goes through his life chronologically, with some interesting commentary from his family 3 of his wives , a few of his kids, but especially artists from the time, like Clapton, Jack Bruce and a host of admiring drummers who give their insights on his legacy. Throughout the film, the chain smoking Baker appears sometimes to be put off by having to recollect various times in his life, but that would be true of just about anyone.

    Just watching some of the great clips over the times you realize that he just had the profound ability to play. If you're a fan of his work, this is essential. Otherwise, this is a worthy rock doc from a unique talent who has survived long enough to be able to tell it as he saw it. If you're a fan of classic rock then this here is certainly a must-see. There's no denying that Baker managed to influence pretty much every drummer who came after him yet very few know who he is. RainDogJr 2 March BAKER appear, alongside some funny scenes that show the constant dose of insults that director Jay Bulger received from Giner Baker during the filming, it's clear that completing a documentary about a rock n' roll legend as crazy and hostile as Mr.

    Baker was nothing less of a miracle, something will hardly be repeated. The good news is that Bulger's film is definitive so even if Baker were a little more accessible it would be unnecessary and absurd to search him in a near future for a new documentary about his life.

    The young Bulger was lucky enough to fool Baker and make him believe he worked for Rolling Stone magazine back in Bulger didn't miss the chance, and he certainly knew that going to South Africa to talk with the former drummer of Cream was the great opportunity in his life. Since the first minutes we realize the documentary is quite personal, with Bulger's first-person narration that take us to the origins of the project.

    Along the way we have a sort- of father and son relationship between Baker and Bulger; the honesty of both is priceless, and that relationship something quite special that delivers those moments every documentary aspire to achieve, although we have too moments that none — there's no documentary maker in the world that expects to be physically attacked by his central figure, right?

    Even some of his noble acts are seen as craziness — spending the millions he got for the Cream reunion on horses, and on a veterinary hospital for them, took him again to near bankruptcy. The portrait is quite fun, you just have to see Baker's facial expressions in the pictures, but has depressing touches as well that fits perfectly with the "and I'm wasted and I can't find my way home" line from Blint Faith's beautiful tune "Can't Find My Way Home".

    Jazz music plays a very important role for Crumb, and in the whole work of Zwigoff for that matter, and for Baker too. In one of the most memorable tales of the film, Bakers talks about the introduction to heroin and African rhythms he had thanks to an encounter with his idol, British jazz drummer Phil Seamen.

    Categories

    BAKER is the decision to go beyond the already memorable tales. Think again in that story about jazz music, heroin and African sounds, add to it an animation with obscure and surrealistic stuff, and you'll have a great representation of that madness and genius that made of Baker the idol of such brilliant drummers as Stewart Copeland the Police , Neil Peart Rush , Bill Ward Black Sabbath and Nick Mason Pink Floyd. Also, it's a great way to discover more about Africa, its music and some of its past conflicts. Great stuff! I knew quite little about Ginger Baker so the doc was both informing and entertaining.

    A very interesting character and life indeed. An impressive array of musicians are interviewed about him and all profess genuine admiration for his drumming abilities. It doesn't go over the top with long solos which was a good call by the director. People can just listen to his records for that. It whets the appetite nicely to go and listen to his work. Ginger's family come across very well, especially his son, whose love for his father was severely tested on occasion.

    Like the man himself they are refreshingly unpretentious and down to earth. It's quite an honest film which makes it all the better and suits the subject matter to a t. Baker is quite enigmatic which makes for all the more interest trying to figure him out. It took a brave man to make this documentary and Jay Bulger was the right man to do it. I would not have been thick-skinned enough to take Mr.

    A great watch. Thank you sir! Well executed film. While the physical history of Mr Baker is presented, in the end it is his artistic history we learn. The film highlights Baker's many desertions in life. And indeed, eyewitness accounts describe the pain this man has engendered to family, and fellow musicians.

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    Some of the major musicians of our time have one or two line observations, edited around a long, many day, interview with Ginger Baker at his ranch in South Africa. And of course the music. Seven years his junior, I witnessed much of his rock music as it happened. However, had I read that this review must have a minimum of ten lines, l would not have started it. One of the "insights" is Baker's life-long, always changing, relationship to rhythm and drums.

    Insightful too, is the volatile relationships in many of his bands. This documentary, written and directed by Jay Bulger, based on the life and career of Ginger Baker, I thought was rather fascinating and filled with surprises. Baker, whom many consider to be the greatest rock drummer of all time, was living, at the time of the filming in a private gated compound in Tulbagh, South Africa. As one enters the compound a sign clearly states Beware Mr. Baker, perhaps for good reason as Baker is still quite irascible and cantankerous.

    He's also somewhat debilitated by osteoarthritis, but not slowed enough to stop him from physically attacking the director Bulger at one point with his cane. Apparently, Baker was a prodigy on the drums, able to just sit down one day and start playing. His first taste of fame came when he became the drummer for the Graham Bond Organisation, in the 's. However, what brought on instant world wide acclaim was being the founding member of the rock group Cream, bringing on Jack Bruce and Eric Clapton, to produce some of the most influential sounds in music history.

    However, the group only stayed together for about two years, despite their fame. Baker was already showing signs of a violent temper and he apparently was heavily into the drug culture. At one point, he viciously attacked Jack Bruce after an argument. This would be the beginning of a long series of ups and downs for Baker, which were brought to the screen in the film. I'll just note that these included continued drug use, four marriages, earning then blowing through millions of dollars, many career changes and making a lot of enemies and some friends along the way.

    Some of the documentary is Bulger interviewing Baker, in South Africa, while the rest is clips of his amazing talent on the drums, interviews with family and many people he worked with in his career , as well as even some animated snippets illustrating parts of his life. Although I admittedly knew virtually nothing about Ginger Baker before seeing the film, and despite the fact that Baker is obviously not a likable fellow, I was quite fascinated by it and was absorbed by one surprise after another being revealed.

    Ginger Baker is not only one of the greatest drummers ever but also a character who waits for a movie to be made about him. One day maybe a fiction movie will be made, until them we have 'Beware of Mr. Baker' - the documentary made by Jay Bulger. Rock documentaries are now quite 'en vogue' and there is a good reason for this. The big rock stars of the 60s and 70s, well, the ones who survived are now at the age of writing or telling on screen their memories. The younger generations may have heard little about 'Cream' or 'Blind Faith' but they do have an opportunity not only to watch part of their concerts luckily filmed concerts technology developed just in time to catch much of their sounds, moves and the atmosphere of their live shows but also to hear fist hand their version of the history of rock.

    And fans like me are definitely delighted. Baker' is centered around the interview reluctantly given by Baker at his ranch in South-Africa. He is one of those anti-social partners of discussion that you sometimes pity the interviewers about. He certainly loves to complain about his family, other musicians, life and fate in general - one of these guys who seem to love themselves much less than the world lives and admires them. We learn much more about his life from interviews with members of his family his first wife seems still to have a crush on him, his son's best memory is having made music with his father and with other musicians.

    It's the story of a life damaged by drugs abuse and a pattern of behavior that preempted Baker from establishing good working relations with any of his colleague musicians and eventually led to the early breaking of all bands he played in. Yet, it is also doubtful if in the absence of this temper and even of the use of drugs his music would have been the same.

    And music is what is left at the end from such personalities. Great music in the case of Mr.

    The Baker in the Bits

    This is a quote from "Beware of Mr. Baker" which very well describes the character this documentary is about. It's the first directorial effort from Jay Bulger and as he gets beaten with a cane by his protagonist, it certainly wasn't an easy effort. Cream and Ginger Baker's great years were way before my time, so I went into this one knowing almost nothing about it. But it's always nice to know about new things and I wasn't disappointed with the outcome. Ginger Baker, the infamous drummer, is as interesting as it gets and certainly deserves his own documentary tribute, even if he's way into his 70s now that this was made.

    The crass, almost horror-like animation used in the film nicely emphasized how it's a fine line between genius and insanity, a description that is probably hardly more accurate for anybody than Mr. Also I wouldn't mind watching a film about his life that is completely animated in the style it was used here. And I didn't need to know much about playing the drums to see this man's incredible talent. However, there's always another approach to this character and the perfect counterpart to his insanity is also something that I liked the way it was depicted here: his love to animals, especially horses.

    It was very sweet to see his weaker, more vulnerable site and how he truly adored these animals that probably became the center of his life at some point and a bit of a haven for him to compensate for his wild side. Also, I thought the ending was very well done, to see Ginger Baker back from his isolation in South Africa to the stage doing what he always did best, playing the drums and having a great time doing so, especially after saying earlier in the film that his motivation and health when it comes to music are almost completely gone.

    I had admittedly one big "what-the-hell"-moment when I saw him writing an ad for a newspaper to look for a band. Really can't believe a man with his talent, considered by many as one of the greatest to have ever played the drums, could sink so low that he'd have to take drastic measures like these to do what he loved. It was shocking to see how he basically made not much money at all despite being possibly the great creative force behind Cream as he wasn't the one who wrote the songs. It made me happy to see he reached great commercial and critical success afterward again though.

    Another thing I quite enjoyed was to see him in Africa during his younger years. He always seemed to have had a special connection to the Black continent going until today with South Africa and his marriage to a local being possibly the last chapter of this life and it was great to witness how local tribes and their approach to music clearly inspired him in his work. Baker" is a film I'd recommend. It's probably even a must-see for music lovers of the s and s as you see many artists Clapton, Santana